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Dna Day 2013 Essay Help

 

This year ASHG received submissions from students in 39 states and 20 foreign countries, including Turkey, Portugal, Australia, and Nigeria. Asking students to investigate the genetic and environmental components of a complex trait engaged them in deeper thinking about heritability and other influences on human trait development. Many thoughtful and well-written essays were submitted. We would also like to thank the more than 530 genetics experts from the ASHG membership who participated in judging the essays.

 

Congratulations to the 2014 winners and thank you all for participating.  Happy DNA Day!

 

 

2014 Essay Question

 

Complex traits, such as blood pressure, height, cardiovascular disease, or autism, are the combined result of multiple genes and the environment.  For ONE complex human trait of your choosing, identify and explain the contributions of at least one genetic factor AND one environmental factor.  How does this interplay lead to a phenotype?  Keep in mind that the environment may include nutrition, psychological elements, and other non-genetic factors.  If the molecular or biological basis of the interaction between  the genetic and environmental factors is known, be sure to discuss it.  If not, discuss the gaps in our knowledge of how those factors influence your chosen trait. 

 

 

2014 Contest Winners:

Click names below to view essay excerpts.

 

 

Rachel Gleyzer

 

Grade 10 ($1,000)

 

Teacher:

Carol Zepatos

 

Bergen County Academies

Hackensack, NJ

 

 

 

Adesuwa Ero

 

Grade 12 ($600)

 

Teacher:

Susan Wall


Ashbury College

Ottawa, Canada

 

 

Cameron Springer

 

Grade 12 ($400)

 

Teacher:

Carol Stapanowich

 

Bishop Sullivan Catholic

High School

Virginia Beach, VA

 


 

Arwa Abdelhamid
Staten Island Technical High School
Staten Island, NY
Teacher: John Davis

 

Samantha Burns
Lely High School

Naples, FL
Teacher: Bryan Wallace

 

Vivien Chen
Richard Montgomery High School

Rockville, MD
Teacher: Helen Ghent-Paolucci

Hussein Elghazaly
El Alsson British International School

Haraniya, Giza, Egypt
Teacher: Wendy Spence


Lucas Lin
Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology
Alexandria, VA
Teacher: Laura Locklear

 

Sangho Myung
Montgomery Blair High School

Silver Spring, MD
Teacher: Darcy Sloe

Rosie (Alexandra) Nagele
Springside Chestnut Hill Academy

Philadelphia, PA
Teacher: Scott Stein

 

Allison Rerick
Staten Island Technical High School

Staten Island, NY
Teacher: John Davis

 

Karl Tayeb
Bergen County Academies

Hackensack, NJ
Teacher: Judith Pinto

Eytan Weinstein
Tichon Ramah Yerushalayim
Jerusalem, Israel
Teacher: Meira Yan

 

View States & Countries Represented in a full screen map


 

About the Contest

The contest aims to challenge students to examine, question, and reflect on important ideas and issues related to human genetics. Competitive essays are expected to convey substantive, well-reasoned, and evidence-based arguments that demonstrate deep understanding.

Essays are evaluated through three rounds of judging, and every essay is read by a minimum of three judges. Top-scoring essays have typically been scored by a dozen or more judges.
 

 

Questions/Comments: Contact dnaday@ashg.org
 

 

This year ASHG received submissions from students in 37 states and 16 foreign countries, including Turkey, Taiwan, Macadonia, and Ghana. Asking students to focus on the evolving definition of a gene engaged them in deeper thinking about our current understanding of the human genome and the future of genetics. Many thoughtful and well-written essays were submitted. We would also like to thank the more than 500 genetics experts from the ASHG membership who participated in judging the essays.

 

Congratulations to the 2015 winners and thank you all for participating. Happy DNA Day!

 

 

2015 Essay Question

 

In 1969, Jonathan Beckwith, James Shapiro, and Lawrence Eron isolated the first gene, the Lac Z gene from E.coli.  At that time, genes were thought to be discrete, contiguous segments of DNA that coded for functional protein products. Using our current understanding of how the human genome is structured and regulated, and what products it can produce, choose a phenomenon (a molecular process, structure, or product, not a disease) that expands on the traditional definition of a gene. Explain the phenomenon and provide three specific examples of it in the human genome.

 

 

2015 Contest Winners:

Click names below to view essay excerpts.

 

David Yang

 

Grade 11 ($1,000)

 

Teacher:

Judith Pinto

 

Bergen County Academies

Hackensack, NJ

 

Sagan Ghim

 

Grade 10 ($600)

 

Teachers:

Tammy Martin & Richard Rosenbaum


OHSU PSI Program; Wilson High School

Portland, OR

Brian Lue

 

Grade 12 ($400)

 

Teacher:

Martina Davies

 

The John Cooper School

The Woodlands, TX

 

Jacob Mueller

 

Grade 12 ($400)

 

Teacher:

Jessica Graham


McNary High School

Keizer, OR


 

Daria Beatini

Bergen County Academies
Hackensack, NJ
Teacher: Judith Pinto

 

Jennifer Chen
Winston Churchill High School

Potomac, MD

Teacher: Anat Schwartz

 

Arthur Dennis
Bergen County Academies

Hackensack, NJ

Teacher: Judith Pinto

 

Alex Dent
James Madison Memorial High School

Madison, WI

Teacher: Cindy Kellor

Thomas Ferrante
Bergen County Academies

Hackensack, NJ
Teacher: Judith Pinto

 

Isabella Li

East Chapel Hill High School
Chapel Hill, NC
Teacher: Patricia Berge

Rick Li
Naperville Central High School

Naperville, IL

Teacher: Nicholas DiGiovanni

Sarah Link
Eureka High School

Eureka, MO

Teacher: Lindsay Mueller

 

Paul Slaughter

James Madison Memorial High School
Madison, WI
Teacher: Cindy Kellor


Dennis Yatunin
Stuyvesant High School

New York, NY

Teacher: Maria Nedwidek-Moore

 

View States & Countries Represented in a full screen map



 

About the Contest

The contest aims to challenge students to examine, question, and reflect on important ideas and issues related to human genetics. Competitive essays are expected to convey substantive, well-reasoned, and evidence-based arguments that demonstrate deep understanding.

Essays are evaluated through three rounds of judging, and every essay is read by a minimum of three judges. Top-scoring essays have typically been scored by a dozen or more judges.
 

 

Questions/Comments: Contact dnaday@ashg.org