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Good Personal Statement Examples For Teaching

Your personal statement is the heart of your application for work as a newly qualified teacher and should be re-written for each role. This is your opportunity to provide evidence of how you match the needs of the specific teaching job you are applying for, and earn yourself an invitation to the next stage, which is likely to be a selection day held at the school.

Writing tips for personal statements

See our example personal statement for primary teaching and personal statement for secondary teaching for further guidance.

When completing a personal statement for a teaching job you should usually observe the following guidelines:

  • Do not exceed two sides of A4, unless otherwise instructed.
  • Tailor your statement for each new application according to the nature of the school or LA and the advertised role.
  • Emphasise your individual strengths in relation to the role.
  • Consider using the government's Teachers' Standards to structure your statement, or follow the structure of the person specification.
  • For a pool application, make sure you give a good overview of your skills and experience.
  • It is essential that you give specific examples of what you have done to back up your claims.

What you must cover in your personal statement

Why you are applying for the role:

  • Refer to any knowledge you have of the LA or the school, including any visits to the school and what you learnt from them.
  • Mention any special circumstances, for example, your religious faith, which you think are relevant.

Details about your course:

  • Give an overview of your training course, including the age range and subjects covered, and any special features.
  • If you are a PGCE student, mention your first degree, your dissertation (if appropriate), any classroom-based research projects and relevant modules studied. Also mention if you have studied any masters modules.

Your teaching experience:

  • What year groups you have taught.
  • What subjects you have covered.
  • Any use of assessment strategies or special features of the practices, for example, open-plan, multi-ethnic, team teaching.

Your classroom management strategies:

  • Give examples of how you planned and delivered lessons and monitored and evaluated learning outcomes, including differentiation.
  • Explain how you have managed classrooms and behaviour.
  • Detail your experience of working with assistants or parents in your class.

Your visions and beliefs about primary/secondary education:

  • What are your beliefs about learning and your visions for the future? You could touch on areas such as learning and teaching styles and strategies.
  • Reflect on key policies relevant to the age range you want to teach.

Other related experience:

  • This can include information about any previous work experience.
  • Include training activities you have carried out and ways in which your subject knowledge has been developed.

Other related skills and interests:

  • Give details of any particular competencies, experiences or leisure interests, which will help the school to know more about you as a person.
  • Any involvement in working with children (running clubs, youth work and summer camps) is particularly useful to note.

Aim to end on a positive note. A conclusion which displays your enthusiasm in relation to the specific application and teaching in general will enhance your application, but avoid general statements and clichés.

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