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Race Ethnicity Crime And Justice Essay

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  • Author Biographies

    Eric A. Stewart is the Ronald L. Simons Professor of Criminology at Florida State University’s College of Criminology and Criminal Justice. His research interests include racial inequality and criminal outcomes; crime over the life course; and contextual- and microprocesses that affect adolescent development.

    Patricia Y. Warren is an associate professor at Florida State University’s College of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Her research focuses on crime and social control with particular emphasis on the complex ways that race, ethnicity, and gender influence sentencing and policing outcomes.

    Cresean Hughes is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice at the University of Delaware. His research interests include race, ethnicity, punishment, and social control, with a particular focus on school discipline and other youth justice outcomes.

    Rod K. Brunson is professor and dean of the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. His research examines youths’ experiences in neighborhood contexts, with a specific focus on the interactions of race, class, and gender, and their relationship to criminal justice practices.